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Winter 2021 Class Schedule

Winter 2021 class Schedule

Course Title Instructor Day/Time
Introductory and Intermediate French Language Courses

FRENCH 111-2-20

FRENCH 111-2-21

FRENCH 111-2-22

FRENCH 111-2-23

Elementary French

Dempster

Dempster

Wei

Nguyen

MTWTh

FRENCH 115-2-20

FRENCH 115-2-21

Intensive Elementary French

Nguyen

Nguyen

MTWTh

FRENCH 121-2-20

FRENCH 121-2-21

FRENCH 121-2-22

FRENCH 121-2-23

FRENCH 121-2-24

FRENCH 121-2-25

Intermediate French

Viot-Southard

Marchaisse

Cotton

Grimm

Grimm

Cappella

MTWTh

FRENCH 125-3-20

FRENCH 125-3-21

FRENCH 125-3-22

FRENCH 125-3-23

Intensive Intermediate French

Raymond

Raymond

Tasevska

Tasevska

MWF
FRENCH 202 Writing Workshop Rey MWF
FRENCH 203 Oral Workshop Pent MWF
Introductory Literature and Culture Courses
FRENCH 211 Reading Cultures in French Grimm MWF
FRENCH 273 Introducing Poetry Licops TTh
Courses with Reading and Discussion in English

FRENCH 277-0-20
/CLS 202

FRENCH 277-0-60

FRENCH 277-0-61

FRENCH 277-0-62

Literature of Existentialism

 

Durham

Ben Hammed

Passos

Winter

MW

F

F

F

Courses with Prerequisites in French
FRENCH 300 French Phonetics Scarampi MWF
FRENCH 301 Advanced Language in Context: Society and Popular Culture Viot-Southard

TTh

FRENCH 303 Advanced Conversation: Debating Contemporary France Pent MWF
FRENCH 309 French For Professions Raymond MWF
FRENCH 322 Medieval French Narratives Davis TTh
FRENCH 360 From Modernism to Postmodernism Durham MWF
FRENCH 395 Advanced Studies in Culture and Thought Qader TTh
Graduate Courses
FRENCH 410 Studies in Medieval Literature Davis Th

FRENCH 493
/CLS 487

Topics in Literary Theory Torlasco W
Courses Taught in Italian
ITALIAN 101-1 Elementary Italian Delfino MTWF

ITALIAN 101-2-20

ITALIAN 101-2-21

ITALIAN 101-2-22

Elementary Italian

Delfino

Pozzi Pavan

Delfino

MTWF

ITALIAN 102-2-20

ITALIAN 102-2-21

ITALIAN 102-2-22

Intermediate Italian

Pozzi Pavan

Eufusia

Morgavi

MTWF

ITALIAN 133-2

ITALIAN 134-2

Intensive Italian Morgavi MTWF
ITALIAN 204 Introducing Italian literature: La lingua più bella al mondo Nasti TTh
Courses with Readings and Discussion in English
ITALIAN 275 Dante’s Divine Comedy Nasti TTh
ITALIAN 377 Gender and Sexuality in 20th-Century Italian Culture: Film, Television, and the Spectacle of Everyday Life Torlasco TTh

 

Winter 2021 course descriptions

FRENCH 111-2: Elementary French

French 111-2 is the second course of a three-quarter sequence (Fall, Winter and Spring) for beginners. This course covers grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, conversation and culture. The aim of the course is to learn and develop skills in speaking, understanding, reading, writing and cultural competence. Class meets four times a week and will be conducted in French.

French 111 is for students with less than one year of High School French or with no previous study of French.

If students have studied French for more than one year in High School and have not received permission from the course coordinator to enroll in French 111, they will not receive credit for this course.

Students who have studied French before should enroll in the Intensive First-year course sequence French 115-1 (Fall) and 115-2 (Winter).

No P-N is allowed.

FRENCH 115-2: Intensive Elementary French

French 115-2 is the second course of a two-quarter sequence (Fall and Winter) that covers the same mate-rial as the three-quarter sequence of French 111, but which assumes some prior knowledge of the language. The aim of the course is to review and develop skills in speaking, understanding, reading, writing and cul-tural competence.

FRENCH 121-2: Intermediate French

French 121-2 is the second quarter of a three-quarter course for students who have completed French 121-1 or have been placed in that course by the French department. The aim of the course is to develop students\' commu-nication skills and cultural knowledge. Class meets four times a week.

Prerequisite: French 121-1 or placed in the course by the Department.

FRENCH 125-3: Intensive Intermediate French

French 125-3 is the third quarter of the three-quarter Intensive Intermediate French course for students who have completed French 125-2 or have been placed in that course by the French department. The primary goal of this course is to strengthen oral and written communication skills by immersing stu-dents in authentic cultural contexts and language. A review of essential grammar will reinforce linguistic foundations. Class meets three times a week and will be conducted in French.

Prerequisite: French 125-2 or placed in the course by the Department.

FRENCH 202: Writing Workshop: Cultural Encounters in Contemporary France

This course is designed to develop and improve writing skills through a variety of classroom activi-ties: discussion, writing, editing. Students will learn how to write a college-level analytical paper. Selected grammar points will be discussed in class, and course content will be provided by a novel and two films. Homework will include short writing exercises and compositions as well as the prepara-tion of grammar exercises related to the writing ob-jectives. This course serves as prerequisite for most other 200 and 300-level French classes.

Prerequisite: French 201, 203, or placement by the Department.

 

FRENCH 203: Oral Workshop: Individual and Society in France Today

This course is designed to build fluency in speaking and understanding French. Classes will concentrate on increasing listening comprehension through view-ing of videos and films, building vocabu-lary and idiom use, and enhancing oral communication skills. One group project based on a play.

Prerequisite: French 125-3, French 201-0, or placement by the Department.

 

FRENCH 211: Reading Cultures in French: Walking and the City

This class focuses on the French art of “flânerie,” or the act of strolling aim-lessly through the city, in modern and contemporary French culture, from the late eighteenth century to present. Ex-ploring the intersection between the city walker and the urban environ-ments that he or she navigates on foot, this class will provide a unique per-spective on the role and place of pub-lic space in the construction of urban modernity in France. This class adopts an explicitly class-, race-, and gender-critical approach to the study of “flâne-rie”—an able-bodied practice that has traditionally been associated with a certain “Baudelairean” archetype of bourgeois masculinity—asking: Who has the right to linger and be seen in public space? How does the act of strolling aimlessly through the city in-tersect with other forms of societal priv-ilege, and when and where can wan-dering become a means of protest, re-sistance, or subversion? By tracing the itineraries and embodied geographies that are traversed by flâneurs and flâ-neuses alike, this course aims to cre-ate a map of social mobility and urban modernity in the ever-evolving French city.

Prerequisite: Registration is conditional on at least one of the following requirements: 1) completion of French 202; 2) an AP score of 5 and a placement test; 3) the consent of the instructor.

 

FRENCH 273: Introducing Poetry in French

This course introduces students to two ap-proaches to reading poetry: we aim, first, to accompany students in developing a personal appreciation for “the possible richness of po-etic parole”, and second, to introduce stu-dents to the close reading and analysis of French poetry. We first read and analyze a few poems from the 16th and 17th centuries to learn about traditional poetic form, language, and expression. We then study representa-tive 19th century poems from movements and poets that are considered “the sources of modern poetry.” Then we explore the “adven-tures” of poetic writing and language in the works of key French and Francophone poets of the 20th and 21st centuries. In our explora-tion of poetry, we study poems in relation to their social and historical contexts. Some of the central questions we reflect on are: How does form relate to meaning? How has poetry evolved in response to historical and social changes? What are the main themes? What is poetry? What are the places and roles of po-etry in the world - past and present? How do answers to these questions vary in time and different cultures? We also focus, among oth-ers, on a central theme that has inspired po-ets of all ages and cultures: Nature. The course incorporates creative elements.

Prerequisite: French 210, French 211, or consent of the instructor.

 

FRENCH 277: French Existentialism

This course, taught in English, will serve as an introduction to existentialism, which not only defined the literary, philosophical and political culture for French intellectuals of the post-war period, but also remain indis-pensable for an understanding of various currents of contemporary literature and cul-ture. We shall begin by discussing the philo-sophical and literary foundations of existen-tialism. Then we will examine the moral, so-cial and political questions central to existen-tialism, as worked out in the fiction, drama, and essays of such authors as Sartre, Beau-voir, Beckett, and Fanon. Finally, we will consider the extent to which post-existentialist thought and culture may be read as a continuation of or as a reaction against existentialism.

 

FRENCH 300: French Phonetics: Theory and Practice of French Sounds

This course is designed to help you improve the pronunciation, intonation, and fluency of your spoken French, as well as to give you an overall under-standing of the phonetic system of the contemporary French language.

Prerequisite: French 202 or consent of instructor.

 

FRENCH 301: Advanced Language in Context: Advanced Grammar Through French Media

Advanced Grammar Through French Media is designed for students who are interested in news media. The purpose of this course is to study, un-derstand and practice grammar in con-text. A variety of authentic documents, from newspapers articles to radio in-terviews, will illustrate and enliven specific grammar points. French 301 will help students master the finer points of French Grammar while pre-paring them to communicate compe-tently (in writing and orally) in informal and formal situations.

Prerequisite: Students must have taken and passed French 202 prior, or they must obtain the consent of the instructor.

 

FRENCH 303: Advanced Conversation: Debating Contemporary France

The goal of this course is the develop-ment of oral proficiency through speech functions, conversational routines and patterns, so as to build confidence in the practice of the French language. In or-der to achieve this goal, emphasis will be put on extensive examination of French press and French television news, French movies, the reading of a book related to the author studied this quar-ter, and spontaneous expression through dialogues and discussion, and even debates. Special emphasis will be placed on group work and culturally ap-propriate usage. The students will par-ticipate actively in the choice of the ma-terials.

 

FRENCH 309: French for Professions: French for Health Professions

How do healthcare systems and approaches to wellness differ across cultural and linguistic contexts? This course is designed especially for students planning a career in the health professions, global health, and/or public health.” In this course, students will gain knowledge of the different models of healthcare systems in Francophone countries as well as familiarity with some specific terminologies and grammatical structures employed in the field. Using communicative and task-based approaches, students will discuss current issues, examine and reflect on ethical beliefs and values, through topics such as healthcare access, terminal illness, the use of technology etc.

Class discussions and activities as well as written assignments will be based on videos, press articles, and on the reading of a short novel related to the medical field. Students will research topics and share their findings through oral presentations. They will also explore their personal area of interest in the field.

Prerequisite: French 202 or consent of instructor.

FRENCH 322: Encountering the Other in Medieval French Literature: Narratives of Travel, Exploration and Crusade

This course studies French narratives of travel and discovery, both real and fic-tional, including medieval romance, reli-gious pilgrimages, the travels of Marco Polo and early French accounts of colo-nialism in Brazil and Canada.

FRENCH 360: From Modernism to Postmodernism: Experiments in Narrative Form

Focusing primarily on first-person narratives and autobiographical fictions, this course will explore how the crises and transformations of narrative form in twentieth-century French and Francophone literature and film both expressed and helped form new notions of memory and identity, as well as articulating new ways of imagining the relationship between collective life and individual experience. Authors read will include such writers and filmmakers as André Gide, Marcel Proust, Jean-Paul Sartre, Georges Bataille, Assia Djebar, Alain Resnais, and Chris Marker.

Class discussion and lectures (in French).

FRENCH 395: Advanced Studies in Culture and Thought: Deciphering the Everyday: Myth, Ideology, Culture

In recent years, increasing attention is being directed to deciphering the eve-ryday with the understanding that monuments, public spaces and everyday objects and cultural practices are bear-ers of layers of meaning. The idea is not new. Twentieth century French thought has produced robust and sustained re-flections on how to understand and re-late to the everyday. Yet, much of these thoughts are too often set aside and for-gotten, naturalizing our relationship to what is actually produced and con-structed in such a way as to do specific ideological work. This course will return to this practice of reading and decipher-ing our everyday myths.

In the first half of the quarter, we will begin with Mythologies Postcoloniales, that reflects on names of public spaces in France, such as streets, through the lens of colonial history. This reading will then be followed by Roland Barthes’ fa-mous Mythologies teaching us in a fluid and enjoyable manner how to read eve-ryday practices and objects. We will then turn our attention to segments of one of the most important theoretical works of the twentieth century in this critical domain, Henri Lefebvre’s La Pro-duction de l’espace, in order to under-stand the ways in which space is pro-duced and signified more broadly. Stu-dents will have the opportunity to prac-tice their own acts of reading and deci-phering in order to put their theoretical knowledge to work. The second half of the course will be dedicated to develop-ing, researching and writing a culminat-ing senior research project.

Prerequisite: Seniors Majoring in French

FRENCH 410: Troubadours and Tradition

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to medieval lyric poetry in Occitan and Old French. The trouba-dours flourished in the south of France during the twelfth and thirteenth centu-ries, producing a dazzlingly varied and innovative corpus of lyrics, which exer-cised a profound influence on the devel-opment of lyric poetry in other Europe-an vernaculars, notably the Old French trouvère tradition. We will examine troubadour lyrics and the cultural con-texts that produced them, and also think more broadly about the construction and function of literary traditions, both medieval and modern.

FRENCH 493: Topics in Literary Theory: Introduction to Cinema/Media/Sound Studies

The aim of this course is to introduce new graduate students to twentieth-century theo-ries of film, media, and sound studies, with special emphasis on the French and German contexts. We will work around specific ques-tions and trace the ways in which they have been pursued by theorists and practitioners alike. How can we conceptualize the relation between art and technology? Can we speak of perception and memory independently of specific technical apparatuses? What is at stake in the shift from analog to digital media at the level of both inscription and reception? As we focus on different kinds of media, we will read texts by Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin, Friedrich Kittler, Bernard Stiegler, and Lisa Nakamura, among others. We will also analyze films and art installations by Guy Debord, Harun Farocki, Hito Steyerl, and John Akomfrah.

ITALIAN 101-1: Elementary Italian

A beginning course in Italian language and culture, Elementary Italian is devoted to developing all four language skills (speak-ing, listening, reading, and writing) within the three modes of communication (inter-personal, interpretive, presentational). While studying the language, students will be introduced to Italy and its people and they will gain both language and cultural competence. At the end of full-year Italian 101 sequence, students will be able to handle successfully a few uncomplicated communicative tasks, participate in simple conversations on topics related to personal information, personal preferences, daily activities, and immediate needs.
This course is the first in a three-part se-quence for beginning students of Italian. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and are very lively, with lots of give-and-take among participants. Students with some experience in Italian may take the online placement test to place out of any or all of the first-year sequence.

ITALIAN 101-2: Elementary Italian

A beginning course in Italian language and culture, Elementary Italian is devoted to developing all four language skills (speak-ing, listening, reading, and writing) within the three modes of communication (inter-personal, interpretive, presentational). While studying the language, students will be introduced to Italy and its people and they will gain both language and cultural competence. At the end of full-year Italian 101 sequence, students will be able to handle successfully a few uncomplicated communicative tasks, participate in simple conversations on topics related to personal information, personal preferences, daily activities, and immediate needs.
This course is the first in a three-part se-quence for beginning students of Italian. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and are very lively, with lots of give-and-take among participants. Students with some experience in Italian may take the online placement test to place out of any or all of the first-year sequence.

Prerequisite: IT 101-1 or equivalent

ITALIAN 102-2: Intermediate Italian

Italian 102-2 is the second part of the inter-mediate sequence.
Intermediate Italian continues and completes the two-year sequence in Italian language and culture. At the end of the full 102 se-quence (102-1,2,3), students are expected to create with the language when talking and writing about familiar topics, to understand the main ideas and some supporting details from a variety of texts (newspaper articles, short stories, …), to describe and narrate, with some consistency, in all major time frames while organizing their discourse into paragraphs. Students will significantly in-crease their knowledge of Italy's history and culture and they will be guided to become independent learners. After the completion of the entire sequence of Italian 102, stu-dents will be eligible to study in Italy and will be ready to embark on the minor or ma-jor in Italian. The second-year Italian course sequence completes the two-year WCAS language requirement. The classroom is very lively, with lots of conversation, partnering, and small group exercises.

Prerequisite: IT 102-1 or equivalent

ITALIAN 133-2/134-2: Intensive Italian

Italian 133/134-2 is the second segment of the intensive course that started in fall. Intensive Italian is a double course that fulfills the WCAS two-year language requirement in one academic year. At the end of the entire 133/134 sequence, students will be able to create with the language when talking and writing about familiar topics; to understand the main ideas and some supporting details from a variety of texts (newspaper articles, short stories, …); to describe and narrate, with some consistency, in all major time frames while organizing their discourse into paragraphs. While studying the language, students will be constantly exposed to the Italian culture. By the end of the intensive sequence, students are expected to achieve language, cultural, and intercultural compe-tence enabling them to study in Italy and to embark on the minor or major in Italian. In-tensive Italian classes are small and highly interactive.

Prerequisite: IT 133-1/134-1.

ITALIAN 204: Introducing Italian literature: La lingua piu' bella al mondo

This course will explore the development of Italian literary discourse and its func-tions from its origins to the 21th century. At a time when the official culture was latinate, the first 'literary' text written in Italian vernacular was a prayer to the Lord. From this humble and devout origin Italian became the language of choice for poets who, writing about love, addressed read-ers, above all women, who were other-wise excluded from literary consump-tion. By these means, the Italian vernacu-lars gained authority and expanded their field of application: Machiavelli wrote in 'Italian' for politicians and rulers, Vasari compiled the first history of art 'manual'. Italian became the 'national language' of culture. In the second part of the course we will explore the way in which literary Italian developed in a fully blown range of genres and styles: novels, children litera-ture, theatre and poetry. We will considers texts ranging from Pinocchio to Pirandel-lo's theatrical texts, from Foscolo's roman-tic novels to the novellas written by Verga to give a voice to the poor and humble. We will also consider literary works recently written by migrants as well as by Roberto Saviano to expose the cancer of mafia. Taught in ITALIAN.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Italian 102-3 or equivalent proficiency.

ITALIAN 275: Dante’s Divine Comedy: To Love Through Justice

Refashioning the conventions of poet-ry, Dante (1265-1321) used the ac-count of his presumed journey through the three realms of the Christian after-life – Hell, Purgatory and Paradise – to explore the world at the close of the Middle Ages. The poem is both an ad-venture story and an exhaustive, as-sessment of the state of politics, socie-ty, religion, literature, philosophy, and theology at the beginning of the four-teenth century. This course examines a selection of cantos Dante's Inferno and Purgatorio in its cultural, social and political context. In particular we will explore how the underground world imagined by the poet relates to late medieval urban life and culture. A guiding concern of the discussion is to assess the ways in which Dante changed our understanding of the re-lationship between the human and the divine, justice and love, will and rea-son, happiness and knowledge, litera-ture and the Bible. Political turmoil, philosophical and theological para-digms social and religious conflict all converge in the making of Inferno and Purgatorio and will thus form crucial elements of our investigation. Taught in English

Prerequisite: No prerequisites in Italian.

ITALIAN 377: Gender and Sexuality in Italian Culture: Feminist Utopias/Dystopias in Art, Film, and Literature

How can we imagine modes of life that oppose social injustice and the tangle of race, gender, and class hierarchies that sustains it? What would a world that radically promotes or even realizes jus-tice look like? This course will investigate the ways in which feminist writers, art-ists, and filmmakers have denounced the present and imagined a future that does not resemble the past, reinventing for us the very texture of daily life. Among the themes we will explore are the relation between architecture, ur-ban planning, and various forms of sur-veillance/control; the relation between work and life, with a focus on domestic labor and the struggles of the 1970s in-ternational feminist movement; and the relation between the demands of the community and personal freedom. While concentrating on 20th and 21st century, we will draw our cases from literature and speculative science fiction (Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower and Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale) and a variety of media practices: film (Lizzie Borden’s Born in Flames and Elizabeth Tadic’s Umojia: No Men Al-lowed), performance and video art (Martha Rosler’s Semiotics in the Kitchen and Beyoncé’s Lemonade), and TV series (Jane Campion’s Top of the Lake and the recent The Handmaid’s Tale).

 

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