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Spring 2021 Class Schedule

Spring 2021 class Schedule

Course # Course Title Spring

FRENCH

FRENCH 105-6 Freshman Seminar

Davis
TTh

FRENCH 111-3 Elementary French Dempster
MTWTh
Dempster
MTWTh
Grimm
MTWTh
Grimm
MTWTh
FRENCH 121-3 Intermediate French

Viot-Southard
MTWTh

Ben Hammed Dorval
MTWTh

Cotton
MTWTh

Marciano
MTWTh

Marchaisse
MTWTh

FRENCH 125-1 Intensive Intermediate French

Nguyen
MWF

FRENCH 202 Writing Workshop

Nguyen
MWF

FRENCH 203 Oral Workshop

Pent
MWF

FRENCH 211 Reading Cultures in French

Tasevska
TTh

FRENCH 272 Introducing Theatre

Dupas
TTh

FRENCH 301 Advanced Language in Context: Society and Popular Culture

Viot-Southard
TTh

FRENCH 303 Advanced Conversation: Debating Contemporary France

Pent
MWF

FRENCH 310 The Middle Ages and Renaissance

Davis
TTh

FRENCH 340 Sexual Politics and the Ancien Regime Dupas
TTh
FRENCH 375 French Film

Durham
TTh

FRENCH 470 Topics in Literary Studies

Durham
T

FRENCH 493 Topics in Literary Theory

Garraway
Th

ITALIAN

ITALIAN 101-2 Elementary Italian Delfino
MWF, T asynchronous
ITALIAN 101-3 Elementary Italian Pozzi Pavan
MWF, T asynchronous
Pozzi Pavan
MWF, T asynchronous
ITALIAN 102-3 Intermediate Italian Delfino
MWF, T asynchronous
Morgavi
MWF, T asynchronous
Morgavi
MWF, T asynchronous
Italian 110 Italian in the Business World

Pozzi Pavan
MWF, T asynchronous

ITALIAN 133/134-3 Intensive Italian Visconti
MWF, T asynchronous
ITALIAN 250 Topics in Italian Culture and Literature Di Rocco
TTh
ITALIAN 310 Reading Italian Literature (taught in Italian) Di Rocco
TTh
ITALIAN 370 Major Figures in Italian History and Culture Ricciardi
TTh

 

Spring 2021 course descriptions

FRENCH 105-6-20: First-Year Seminar

ARTS OF LOVE IN THE MIDDLE AGES AND RENAISSANCE. This course explores the evolution of love as a central theme in French literature during the Middle Ages and Renaissance. The period in question saw major transformations in almost every aspect of human life, from law and government to technology, science and the arts. Despite these changes, love remained a central preoccupation of writers in every literary genre. Why? We will approach the texts on our reading list not only as records of the past, but as points of contact, which allow us to confront the role of literary traditions in constructing notions of individuality, family, sexuality and gender. How did social and historical changes influence the representation of emotion and desire? How might love as a literary theme comment on the changing status of the individual and his or her role in society?


FRENCH 111-3: Elementary French

French 111-3 is the third course of a three-quarter sequence (Fall, Winter and Spring) for beginners. This course covers grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, conversation and culture. The aim of the course is to learn and develop skills in speaking, understanding, reading, writing and cultural competence. Class meets four times a week and will be conducted in French.

FRENCH 121-3: Intermediate French

French 121-3 is the third quarter of a three-quarter course for students who have completed French 111-3 or have been placed in that course by the French department. The aim of the course is to develop students' communication skills and cultural knowledge. Class meets four times a week. No P/N allowed.

FRENCH 125-1: Intensive Intermediate French

French 125-1 is the first quarter of a three-quarter course for students who have completed FR115-2 or been placed in the course upon taking the French Placement Test. The primary goal of this course is to strengthen oral and written communication skills by immersing students in authentic cultural contexts and language. A review of essential grammar will reinforce linguistic foundations. Class meets three times a week and will be conducted in French.

FRENCH 202: Writing Workshop

CULTURAL ENCOUNTERS IN CONTEMPORARY FRANCE. This course is designed to develop and improve writing skills through a variety of classroom activities: discussion, writing, editing. Students will learn how to write a college-level analytical paper. Selected grammar points will be discussed in class, and course content will be provided by a novel and two films. Homework will include short writing exercises and compositions as well as the preparation of grammar exercises related to the writing objectives. This course serves as prerequisite for most other 200 and 300-level French classes.

FRENCH 203: Oral Workshop

INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY IN FRANCE TODAY. This course is designed to build fluency in speaking and understanding French. Classes will concentrate on increasing listening comprehension through viewing of videos and films, building vocabulary and idiom use, and enhancing oral communication skills. One group project based on a play.

FRENCH 211: Reading Cultures in French

INSIDERS, OUTSIDERS, AND BELONGING IN CONTEMPORARY FRANCE AND THE FRANCOPHONE WORLD: INTERMEDIAL EXPLORATIONS. This course introduces students to some of the formative experiences, cultural values, and voices that have influenced forms of belonging, inclusion, and exclusion in contemporary French-speaking cultures, as depicted in literature, cinema, and popular culture from the second half of the twentieth century. We will closely read prose fiction, films, bandes dessinées, and visual-poetic experimentations, focusing on the relationships among these various cultural forms. We will explore the ways writers and artists follow or depart from the traditions and media they engage with, taking up issues of France’s colonial history, re-examination of its wartime past and memory, immigration narratives, changing familial and gender relationships, as well as the quest for collective and personal identity and freedom. Works include Jean-Luc Godard’s re-appropriation of early French-language comics such as Les Pieds Nickelés in his film Pierrot le fou (1965), Claire Denis’s auto-fictional film Chocolat (1998) inspired by the novel Une vie de boy (1956) by the Cameroonian writer Ferdinand Oyono, and Marie NDiaye’s insertion of J.M.W. Turner’s romantic paintings into her experimental work La Naufragée (1999). Course and reading materials are in French; films are in the original with English subtitles. Conducted in French, this course is designed to increase students’ ability to speak, read, and write in French, as well as to improve their analytical tools to better appreciate and contextualize French and Francophone works and look critically at their aesthetic frameworks. Literature Fine Arts Distro Area. Prerequisites: French 202, AP score of 5, or consent of instructor.

FRENCH 272: Introducing Theater in French

TRAGIC CONSCIOUSNESS IN MODERN FRENCH DRAMA. Did tragic consciousness vanish in the modern era? Reading Racine, Molière, Voltaire, Hugo, Jarry, Beckett and Ionesco, we will address the persistence and the redefinition of the notion of the tragic in modern French drama, while the opposition between comedy and tragedy progressively declines.

FRENCH 301: Advanced Language in Context

ADVANCED GRAMMAR THROUGH FRENCH MEDIA. Advanced Grammar Through French Media is designed for students who are interested in news media. The purpose of this course is to study, understand and practice grammar in context. A variety of authentic documents, from newspapers articles to radio interviews, will illustrate and enliven specific grammar points. French 301 will help students master the finer points of French Grammar while preparing them to communicate competently (in writing and orally) in informal and formal situations.

FRENCH 303: Advanced Conversation

DEBATING CONTEMPORARY FRANCE. The goal of this course is the development of oral proficiency through speech functions, conversational routines and patterns, so as to build confidence in the practice of the French language. In order to achieve this goal, emphasis will be put on extensive examination of French press and French television news, French movies, the reading of a book related to the author studied this quarter, and spontaneous expression through dialogues and discussion, and even debates. Special emphasis will be placed on group work and culturally appropriate usage. The students will participate actively in the choice of the materials.

FRENCH 310: Middle Ages and Renaissance

NATURE, GENDER, AND DESIRE. Medieval French literature shows a persistent interest in examining human relationships to the natural world, which provides both a literal and symbolic point of comparison for establishing fundamental attitudes about gender, sexuality, the body, and the status of the individual. In this class, we will read a variety of literary texts that probe and question the ‘nature’ of nature to highlight the ideological structures (religious, political, moral) that shaped and formed medieval people’s concept of the self. 

FRENCH 375: French Film

This course will consider developments in French and Francophone cinema since the Second World War, with a particular emphasis on the works of directors associated or in dialogue with the "New Wave." We will examine the reinvention of cinematic form by these filmmakers, but we will also explore how such formal innovations may be understood as attempts to respond to the historical events and social processes that transformed French culture in that period, most notably the traumas of the Second World War, the emergence of consumer culture, and the processes of decolonization and globalization. Among the directors whose works will be discussed are Jean Renoir, Agnès Varda, Robert Bresson, Jean-Luc Godard, Jacques Tati, Luis Buñuel, Alain Resnais, Chris Marker, and Djibril Diop Mambéty.

FRENCH 470: Topics in Literary Studies

DELEUZE ON FILM: FROM AESTHETICS TO POLITICS. The course will focus primarily on Deleuze's two-volume work on film, Cinema I: The Movement-Image and Cinema II: The Time-Image as well as on Deleuze’s cinematic corpus. We will also explore related texts by Deleuze on cinema, literature, and art, as well as others written by his interlocutors and critics. Among the questions to be considered will be the different articulations of the problem of the aesthetic (and social) whole, both in Deleuze’s accounts of pre- and postwar film and in his other writings on aesthetics; the relationship of history to the inactual in Cinema I and II (and elsewhere in Deleuze); the points of contact and divergence between Deleuze’s work on cinema and that of other thinkers, such as Foucault and Rancière; and the various ways in which Deleuze’s writings on cinema and art pose the problem of thinking an aesthetic politics.


FRENCH 103:

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FRENCH 493: Topics in Literary Theory

POSTCOLONIAL/DECOLONIAL THOUGHT IN THE FRANCOPHONE WORLD. This course introduces students to a diverse field of French-language intellectual production concerned with analyzing, contesting, and transforming colonial relations of power and knowledge. French-language authors have produced some of the most radical critiques of French and European imperial projects in the modern era while innovating and/or contributing substantially to related fields such as critical race studies, gender and sexuality studies, literary theory, discourse analysis, literature, and philosophy. Yet, their reception in the Anglophone academy has often been marked by decontextualized or selective readings. Our priority will be to foreground the specificity of the French-language decolonial tradition as a response to a particular brand of colonialism rooted in a universalizing, humanist project, as well as to the particular local manifestations and effects of this project. Ranging across four main sites of theoretical production, including revolutionary Haiti, the mid-20th-century French Caribbean/Parisian axis, and Sub-Saharan Africa, our readings will highlight the ways in which French-language thinkers from Jean-Jacques Dessalines to Achille Mbembe have forged a distinctly non-essentialist theoretical tradition by innovating within and against intellectual currents of Enlightenment universalism, existentialism, historical materialism, psychoanalysis, structuralism, and post-structuralism. At the same time, through critical analysis and secondary readings, we will evaluate the continued relevance of these thinkers’ attempts to conceptualize issues of intellectual and psychic (dis)alienation, political sovereignty, cultural identity, artistic creation, and freedom for intellectual projects in the humanities and social sciences today. Main texts by Toussaint Louverture, Jean-Jacques Dessalines, Aimé Césaire, Jane Nardal, Paulette Nardal, Suzanne Césaire, Frantz Fanon, Édouard Glissant, V.Y. Mudimbe, and Achille Mbembe, with relevant secondary readings as needed. Taught in English, with texts available in both French and English.

ITALIAN 101-2: Elementary Italian

A beginning course in Italian language and culture, Elementary Italian is devoted to developing all four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) within the three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, presentational). While studying the language, students will be introduced to Italy and its people and they will gain both language and cultural competence. At the end of full-year Italian 101 sequence, students will be able to handle successfully a few uncomplicated communicative tasks, participate in simple conversations on topics related to personal information, personal preferences, daily activities, and immediate needs. This course is the second in a three-part sequence for beginning students of Italian. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and are very lively, with lots of give-and-take among participants.

ITALIAN 101-3: Elementary Italian

A beginning course in Italian language and culture, Elementary Italian is devoted to developing all four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) within the three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, presentational). While studying the language, students will be introduced to Italy and its people and they will gain both language and cultural competence. At the end of full-year Italian 101 sequence, students will be able to handle successfully a few uncomplicated communicative tasks, participate in simple conversations on topics related to personal information, personal preferences, daily activities, and immediate needs. This course is the third in a three-part sequence for beginning students of Italian. Classes are conducted entirely in Italian and are very lively, with lots of give-and-take among participants

ITALIAN 102-3: Intermediate Italian

Italian 102-3 is the third part of the intermediate sequence.
Intermediate Italian continues and completes the two-year sequence in Italian language and culture. At the end of the full 102 sequence (102-1,2,3), students are expected to create with the language when talking and writing about familiar topics, to understand the main ideas and some supporting details from a variety of texts (newspaper articles, short stories, …), to describe and narrate, with some consistency, in all major time frames while organizing their discourse into paragraphs. Students will significantly increase their knowledge of Italy's history and culture and they will be guided to become independent learners. After the completion of the entire sequence of Italian 102, students will be eligible to study in Italy and will be ready to embark on the minor or major in Italian. The second-year Italian course sequence fulfills the two-year WCAS language requirement. The classroom is very lively, with lots of conversation, partnering, and small group exercises.

ITALIAN 110: Italian in the Business World

This course will introduce students to the language of business and commerce, the Italian business culture, its entrepreneurships, and the success of Made in Italy brands. While acquiring business-related Italian language skills, students will gain cultural perspectives on Italian business practices and will be guided through intercultural reflection. Students will learn about Italian business culture while familiarizing with the language and the cultural conventions used in business and professional situations. Through a series of task-based assignments (to be completed individually and/or in group) designed to emphasize communication, students will apply interpretive, presentational, and interpersonal skills in real- life business situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies for business transactions and business correspondence, and cultural awareness.

ITALIAN 133-3/134-3: Intensive Italian

IT 133/134-3 is the third segment of the intensive course that started in fall. Intensive Italian is a double course that fulfills the WCAS two-year language requirement in one academic year. At the end of the entire 133/134 sequence, students will be able to create with the language when talking and writing about familiar topics; to understand the main ideas and some supporting details from a variety of texts (newspaper articles, short stories, …); to describe and narrate, with some consistency, in all major time frames while organizing their discourse into paragraphs. While studying the language, students will be constantly exposed to the Italian culture. By the end of the intensive sequence, students are expected to achieve language, cultural, and intercultural competence enabling them to study in Italy and to embark on the minor or major in Italian. Intensive Italian classes are small and highly interactive.

ITALIAN 250: Topics in Italian Culture and Literature

WONDER: THE HISTORY OF AN IDEA.  This course is devoted to the analysis of wonder in Italian literature, understood within the more general framework including marvel, miracle, admiratio and mirabilia. Plato’ discussion in the Theaetetus – where Socrates links wonder to the beginning of philosophy – and Aristotle’s famous definition in his Metaphysics – pointing to man’s basic drive for learning and truth and thus calling attention to the capacity for wonder built in human nature, are fundamental to understand wonder and its development across the centuries. The course follows the ramification of the idea of wonder covering Italian literature from the Middle Ages to Modernity.

ITALIAN 310: Reading Italian Literature

LITERATURE AND MYTH. This course is devoted to classical mythology in Italian literature. Students in this course will explore some of the most famous rewritings of specific myths in prose and poetry from the 19th to the 20th century. Starting with Leopardi’s La scommessa di Prometeo (1824), one of the Operette morali where the author imagines that Prometheus, being disappointed by the results of a contest between the gods, descends on earth together with Momo in order to demonstrate whether mankind can be considered “the best work of any of the immortals to have appeared in the world”, the first part of the course will focus on Pavese’s Dialoghi con Leucò (1947) and Alda Merini’s poetry. Particular attention will be given to the myths of Oedipus, Orpheus and the Muses. The second part of the course will be devoted to the rewritings of Homer’s Odyssey in the work of Vincenzo Consolo.

ITALIAN 370: Major Figures in Italian History and Culture

READING ELENA FERRANTE: THE REINVENTION OF FRIENDSHIP AND LOVE.  In 2016, Time magazine included the Italian novelist who works under the pseudonym “Elena Ferrante” on its list of the year’s hundred most influential people. We will explore some of the most celebrated novels of this mysterious writer, who is beloved not only in Italy but also in the US and around the world. Critics in The New York Times, The New Yorker, The London Review of Books, and numerous other publications have given ecstatic reviews to her writings, typically describing their effect as “mesmerizing,” “stunning,” and “brutally honest.” Indeed, Ferrante’s fearless, cliché-annihilating explorations of friendship, loneliness, troubling loves, sexuality, violence, and maternity suggest a creative and disruptive refashioning of traditional feminist concerns on an epic scale. We begin our consideration of her work with The Days of Abandonment, which revises the trope of the abandoned woman in new and startling ways. We will also discuss the cinematic adaptation. We will then read The Lost Daughter, the novelist’s sophisticated and uncanny investigation of the agonized ambivalence of love and motherhood. Finally, the course concludes with My Brilliant Friend, the first volume of her bestselling series of Neapolitan novels. In particular, we will focus on how this text redefines the contested territory of women’s friendship. Throughout, we will address Ferrante’s decision to keep her true identity secret, thus setting in motion the media’s frenzy to unmask her. Taught in English, seminar style.

 

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